Threshold Of Decency

Dear Mr. Durrett,

In your column about Ann Coulter, you write:

The line we walk is to try and ensure our opinion pages embrace a wide array of viewpoints and style. As I recently wrote one of our longtime readers, we pay attention to the political balance of our syndicated columnists. When you see conservative Cal Thomas on a page, you usually can count on the more liberal Leonard Pitts Jr. in close proximity.

I believe this stated standard is incomplete. Regardless of where any writer might sit on a spectrum, there should be an additional requirement for publication in a newspaper claiming readership from any community of adults, children and families: a threshold of decency.

Decency, of course, like any standard — even the standard of ‘spectrum of political opinion’ — demands judgment. And, in the news business, one would expect those judgments to be broad ones. Still, it is difficult to understand how Ann Coulter sits above any threshold of decency. Any single one at all.

Instead of decency, however, you cite ‘taste’ as the standard to accompany ‘array’. And, it seems the ‘tastes’ you heed are those of your readers: If any reader (enough readers) enjoy Coulter’s barbs and one liners, then the standard of taste is satisfied.

This, in turn, suggests that you seek to appeal to a market segment of readers who might buy your paper in order to enjoy Coulter. It means that your concern for value — for building circulation and profits — governs any concern you might have for other values such as decency.

You and your colleagues at The Shreveport Times make a choice about your values — about what you really stand for — every time you publish. Today, your ‘brand’ — “what you really stand for” — includes giving voice to a kind of hatred that, as you write, is motivated largely by self-promotion on the grounds of political spectrum and taste.

This, in turn, means that should any of your, say, 6 or 8 year-old children ask any of you, “Daddy/Mommy, why do you publicize Ann Coulter’s views in Shreveport?”, you can explain to them, “Well, we do it because it is important for people in Shreveport with these sorts of tastes to read well-known celebrities who express extreme views so that we can publish other well known celebrities with opposite extreme views.”

And this, in turn means, that when your 6 year-olds become, say, 14 or 17 year-olds and, say, take on an editorial role in their high school paper and give voice to a popular kid who espouses hatred and violence, you’ll be okay with it.

Or, maybe you won’t be okay with it. Maybe you and your colleagues will wonder, “What’s happening to our community?”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *