The New Golden Rule

Over the past 36 years, the prevalence of obesity among 12 to 19 year old Americans has doubled — among children 6 to 11 it has tripled. Today, the percentage of kids who are either obese or overweight ranges from a low of 21% in Utah to 40% in Washington DC — and the average across the US is 31%. Meanwhile, government officials report that poor diet and exercise will help push obesity-related diseases past tobacco as the #1 killer in the US.

This epidemic in eating disorders presents a classic case for how our culture of individualism conspires to darken the prospects ahead. The policy battle will rage between those who hold parents and kids individually accountable versus those who look to government regulation for answers. Meanwhile, the food companies who produce, distribute, market and advertise the diets and foods that are killing Americans in growing numbers will sit on their hands, happily making profits while claiming to be ‘socially responsible.” In reality, as this recent BBC item notes, the food companies don’t ‘care a jot’.

In the real world, though, the food companies — and the employees and executives who work in them — are the best positioned to do something about this crisis. They have the resources, the know how, the data, and the motivation — if only they would replace shareholder value fundamentalism with blended values strategies for growth and prosperity. If only they would act to make capitalism sustainable instead of suicidal. Our culture of individualism will rant and rave about consumer and investor boycotts. Fine ideas. But, the real power to do something without waiting for governments to force action lies with the food companies and the thick we’s who work there.

It’s classic. The executives and employees of the food companies spend their working hours sitting on their hands – then spend their nonworking hours in the midst of kids who, because of food company products and marketing, are seriously overweight or obese.

Eventually, we’ll find we have a ‘red vs. blue’ kind of split with regard to food companies — one that already exists with tobacco companies. When this happens, those who work in food companies will be vilified. Why are they waiting? Why not act now — and do so according to the new golden rule in our age of markets, networks, organizations, friends and families:

“As employees, do unto others who are consumers what you would have them as employees do unto you as a consumer.”

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *