Market Based Discussion Doesn’t Work Well

Figuring out the best approaches to difficult problems is hard work in any context. But, it is much harder in a market context than an organizational one. Take as an example Iraq. The problem solving effort does move forward in both contexts; that is, the political market for government direction and policy as well as any number of organizational contexts (e.g. the US Army). A major difference between these two contexts arises from objective and purpose. In organizations, purpose relates to the organization’s reason for being. In the case of the US Army, that purpose has shifted in Iraq from winning a militery conflict toward assisting Iraq in the transition to stability. The second, we’ve come to learn, is much more complex than the first. Still, when those involved in the organization show up to work each day, they do their best to problem solve together toward the purpose at hand.

(Yes, I know, this is a simplification. Many will immediately recoil and get heated up — but that has a lot to do with our perspective on context. How many of us ‘react’ because we are operating within a market perspective versus an organizational one? That is, we are commenting/promoting a point of view we wish would take hold of the political and governmental direction as opposed to contributing to a debate based on the purpose of the US Army and with an obligation to at least imagine we are part of the Army responsible for carrying out that purpose?)

I was reminded of this difference when I read of Representative Murtha’s proposed resolution:

Therefore be it Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That:

Section 1. The deployment of United States forces in Iraq, by direction of Congress, is hereby terminated and the forces involved are to be redeployed at the earliest practicable date.

Section 2. A quick-reaction U.S. force and an over-the-horizon presence of U.S Marines shall be deployed in the region.

Section 3 The United States of America shall pursue security and stability in Iraq through diplomacy

Murtha is operating within an organization – Congress — charged, among other things, with guiding the purposes of the US Army and others. Look closely at his three Sections. Re-read them. Are they a call for the abandonment of Iraq? Are they a call for the immediate withdrawal of troops? Do they suggest the United States should ignore Iraq?

No. Representative Murtha is proposing an alternative strategy — an alternative approach to a phenomenally complex problem.

The market for political control and government policy, however, did not hear or interpret Murtha’s proposal as strategy, however. The market quickly reduced the meaning to branding and product simplification. What the politicans, media and others who compete in that market did was deny the public any real, thoughtful problem-solving guidance by instantaneously transforming Murtha’s strategic possibilities into ‘up or down’, ‘you’re in or you’re out’, “stay the course or cut and run’, ‘you’re with us or against us’, ‘you’re for Bin Ladin or you’re for America’, and so on.

Think about this. Only, for a second, pick any REAL problem or challenge you face at home, school, work, church or elsewhere. Is this the approach to problem-solving you’d like to bet on? Probably not. But then all of those contexts — family, school, work, church — are more like organizational contexts than giant, anonymous and abstract market contexts.

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