Brand Update: Red Cross

The Washington Post has an update on how the post-Katrina, post-Rita brand experience of the Red Cross matched the brand promise. As noted in an earlier post, the Red Cross crossed up its donor after 9/11 in failing to warn folks in advance that some of the funds would be stashed away for other purposes. The charity was so determined to avoid a repetition that they announced to the world post-Katrina they would be spending every single dollar received on Katrina. One concern, raised in the post, had to do with the effect of this overly literal reaction to the earlier difficulty on the full nature of Katrina’s aftermath: namely, that the people of the Gulf coast need both immediate response/relief as well medium to longer term rebuilding help. The Red Cross — the best branded charity in the field — would have access to the most money. And it would have been wonderful if the Red Cross had annouced publicly its intention to raise funds that would, in turn, be provided to strategic partners better positioned to provide rebuliding assistance.

Instead, we got the ‘we’ll spend every dime on immediate relief’ because, in what sounds almost like a petulant child, ‘you slapped our hands the last time for trying to save for another rainy day’. The problems for the Red Cross’s brand and mission here were two fold: poor communications and poor self-understanding of limitations.

Now, we learn that the Red Cross claims it is $340 million short in funds needed for Katrina and Rita. In addition, Congress is readying itself for a ‘look see’ at how the Red Cross responded. Other relief and rebuilding organizations are angry about imperious Red Cross attitudes. And, it’s alleged that if you lived in the Gulf Coast and were African-American, the Red Cross wasn’t quite as likely to respond as if you were Caucasian American.

So, here we go again. America’s best branded, iconic relief organization is about to take another hit to its brand. Will the charity have some reasonable explanations. Yes! Let us not forget the extraordinary scale and propotion of Katrina. And, at the same time, will the Red Cross pass ‘the test’ on having delivered on its brand promise through open communications, good partnering and effective operations?

Well, based on the gathering storm reported in the WP, the answer there looks like it will speak from two camps: Those in the Red Cross will say, “Yes”. Those beyond the Red Cross in the media, African-American citizens of the Gulf Coast, other non-profit organizations needing to respond and rebuild — and certainly some governmental organization including Congress — will say “No”.

At the end of the article, an expert in non-profits calls from more openness. “What happens if you don’t is that you live off your myth and you conceal your problems. They are an organization obsessed by its own myth.”

Myth. Brand. Promise. Delivery.

At the Red Cross, these are critical words. And when it comes to disasters, the folks at the Red Cross must know deeply and wisely what these words mean. And why.

Otherwise, we will continue to see ‘disasters’ following disasters at the Red Cross.

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